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Book review: <i>The True Story Of Butterfish</i> by Nick Earls


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If this was a house, it would be the one Curtis Holland lives in - a classy little Queenslander with a studio out the back in a granny flat, a great record collection and clean sheets for visitors.

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Book review: <i>Snuff</i> by Chuck Palaniuk


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If this was any less erotic, grandparents would be involved. (The fact that the author failed to include any was most likely an accident.)

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Book review: <i>One Step Behind</i> by Henning Mankell


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In a genre where there is so much pulp churned out all the time, it's easy to lose faith in crime fiction. But don't despair, because Henning Mankell is absolutely brilliant, and he rises above the masses effortlessly. Faith restored.

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Book review: <i>The Toe Tag Quintet</i> by Matthew Condon


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A good, solid collection of crime-solving tales, infused with big pinch of Australiana and a twinkle in the eye.

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Book review: <i>Devil May Care</i> by Sebastian Faulks, 'writing as Ian Fleming'


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If this was a car, it would be a grey 1933 Bentley convertible with an Amherst-Villiers supercharger (installed against the advice of MI5 mechanics), NO machine guns and NO freaking ejector seats (though there could well be a bottle of single malt in the glove box).

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Book review: <i>The Troublesome Offspring Of Cardinal Guzman</i> by Louis de Berniéres


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Mildly disappointing, but only compared to the insanely high standards I have come to expect from Mr de Berniéres and his extreme awesomeness as an author.

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Book review: <i>The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time</i> by Mark Haddon



When autistic fifteen year old Christopher John Francis Boone discovers his neighbour’s dog, Wellington, dead on the lawn with a gardening fork sticking in his side, he decides to investigate.

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Book Review: <i>A Wild Sheep Chase</i> by Haruki Murakami



Y'know how all my book reviews start with "y'know how?" Y'know how I recently accused Chuck Pahlaniuk of writing a novel that oversold its blurb.. y'know?

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Mountain Man Dance Moves – The McSweeney’s Book Of Lists</i> by The Editors of McSweeney’s



If this was the beginning of a Miyazaki movie, it would be a montage of bored office workers, each with cheeky-eyed sprites escaping their wasted minds, flitting out the windows and through the skies of the globe to gather together in space as one enormous totally sweet unicorn with a GSOH.

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Book review: <i>Non-Fiction</i> by Chuck Palahniuk



If this was an autobiography, it would be effing awesome, but I’d also like to imagine that Chuck will always be too busy out there doing stuff to pen his own memoirs.

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Book review: <i>The Return Of The Dancing Master</i> by Henning Mankell



I was pleasantly surprised by The Return Of The Dancing Master. I guess from the cover I was expecting a pulp thriller of the most noxious and basic kind, with a name selected for whimsy and to sucker in people like me. What I DIDN’T look at was the author’s name... Henning Mankell. Turns out he’s Swedish. Who knew? Anyway, more to the point, the book was actually originally written in Swedish, and then translated into English. Which gives the whole experience less of a thriller feeling and more of a smugly-reading-foreign-text feeling. Which was nice.

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