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Book review: <i>Native Toungue</i> by Carl Hiaasen


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When you're trying to compete with Florida Disney for your place in the developers market, everything's fair. Right? Even the invention of an endangered species?

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Book review: <i>Skinny Dip</i> by Carl Hiaasen


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Joey Perrone wants revenge on her husband for trying to kill her for no good reason. Her husband, Chaz, wants to get rich and stay that way, by keeping his dirty little un-environmental secret. Can Joey get her husband back and save what's left of the Florida Everglades?

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Book review: <i>1st To Die</i> by James Patterson


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Why do I do it to myself? No, really, why? The only saving grace is that it was over in a couple of hours... oh yes, and I get a kick out of reviewing trash every now and again.

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Book review: <i>Bad Boy Brawly Brown</i> by Walter Mosley



When a man has lived the way Easy Rawlins has—flirting with the wrong side of the law his whole life (or at least in the six previous Easy Rawlins books)—it’s time for him to settle down. He has responsibilities: Bonnie, his beautiful girlfriend. Jesus and Feather, his adopted kids. Even Frenchie, Feather’s little yellow dog who hates him, is a kind of responsibility. He has a good job and a good home and his best friend’s death on his conscience. And... Walter Mosley’s done it again.

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Book review: <i>The Black Dahlia</i> by James Ellroy



The Black Dahlia and the last book I reviewed, Eureka, have some interesting superficial similarities. Firstly, they are both set, for at least part of the time, in the mid 1940s. They are both set in Los Angeles during that time. The protaganist in both is a police officer (both are written mainly in the first person) and the plot line in both focuses on the death of a woman which the protaganist gets a bit obsessive about and is willing to go above and beyond to solve the mystery. However, for all the similarities, Eureka and The Black Dahlia couldn't be more different when it comes to the crunch. Why? Because that would be like comparing a dry cracker to a three course meal.

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