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Genre: Humour

The genre Humour incorporates texts that are funny or humourous.

Book review: Crane Mansions by Gert Loveday


the cover of the book

Dr Crane: Visionary. Pigeon expert. Philanthropist. Cake lover. Crane Mansions has been his home since childhood. But there are forces outside his control, all desperate to uncover the secrets surrounding his world.

Book review: Writing Is Easy by Gert Loveday


the cover of the book

What maketh a writer? Critical acclamation? Sales? A drinking problem? A couple of dirty secrets? Breaking into the business is tough, but staying in it unscathed is even tougher.

Book review: Adrian Mole: The Prostrate Years by Sue Townsend


the cover of the book

I would never have considered the possibility of Adrian Mole growing old, were it not for the recent death of his creator Ms Townsend. So it was with a twinge of sadness for a lost childhood author that I picked up her last Adrian Mole story, because, let's face it, Adrian and I grew up together.

Book review: Marry Me by Carey Marx


the cover of the book

If this was put onto the desk of your average Hollywood producer, it would be bought for MILLIONS. "Goddammit Joel, get Murray in London on a conference right now! Somebody just dropped two hundred minutes of uncut Wacky Date Montage on my desk and I need Hugh Grant STAT!"

Book review: The True Story Of Butterfish by Nick Earls


the cover of the book

If this was a house, it would be the one Curtis Holland lives in - a classy little Queenslander with a studio out the back in a granny flat, a great record collection and clean sheets for visitors.

Book review: Snuff by Chuck Palaniuk


the cover of the book

If this was any less erotic, grandparents would be involved. (The fact that the author failed to include any was most likely an accident.)

Book review: Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole


the cover of the book

If this was a stand-up comedian, it would be that transfixingly terrible lounge singer Andy Kaufman used to inhabit. Only better.

Book review: A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian by Marina Lewycka


the cover of the book

If this was an alcoholic drink, it would be a sweet and surprisingly potent plum wine, brewed to an old family recipe.

Book review: Balsamic Dreams, A Short But Self-Important History of the Baby Boomer Generation by Joe Queenan


the cover of the book

If this was edited with a hatchet, you'd get half a funny book; you could then threaten the author with the hatchet until he produced the other half.

Book review: Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency by Douglas Adams


the cover of the book

Yes, I do love Douglas Adams. Yes, this book is one of my most favouritest books on the face of the earth, and one of my most treasured possessions. And, caveat, they recently made a fun BBC tv series of it! Hip hip hooray!

Book review: Johnny Passe by Scott Fivelson and Tim Cleavenger


the cover of the book

”I'm Passe. Johnny Passe.” In the big city where everyone scurries onto the next big trend, and the classics fall by the wayside, it's easy to become passe. Unless you're noir by Fivelson and Cleavenger. In this case, Passe is enduring.

Book review: Love Me by Garrison Keillor


the cover of the book

If this was... Wine, it would be that Cab Merlot I so freakin' elegantly analogise in paragraph three.

Book review: Whom God Would Destroy by Commander Pants


the cover of the book

A light-hearted romp through the big boys of serious topics - Whom God Would Destroy examines the subjects of religion, psychiatry, the mentally ill, and alien conspiracies in a sniggeringly hilarious meander through some cunning plot twists and a whole new understanding of the universe as it is.

Book review: American Hoax by Charles Firth


the cover of the book

If this was lunch, it would be a Wendy's hot dog with everything.

Book review: Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis


the cover of the book

If this was fused with a grim, dystopian sci-fi blockbuster in some of Godawful teleporter accident it would be the film 'Brazil'.

Book review: After You With The Pistol by Kyril Bonfiglioli


the cover of the book

If this was written by a middle-class douchebag with all the observational skill but zero percent of the humour, it would be any Ian Fleming book.

Book review: The Best A Man Can Get by John O'Farrell

Book review: The Best A Man Can Get by John O'Farrell


the cover of the book

If this was a razor, it would be a Gillette Mach 3 disposable.

Book review: British As A Second Language by David Bennun


the cover of the book

If this was a restaurant, it would serve Springbok kebabs with a union jack spiked, half-jokingly, into the top.

Book blog: The guide to The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy



Douglas Adams’s The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy*, the idea for which initially came to him while lying drunk and penniless in a field far from home, grew from a modest radio program into stage shows, a trilogy of five books, a television series, a computer game, a comic book series, a series of towels, a Hollywood blockbuster, and re-adaptions for radio—and, of course, a fabulously successful worldwide phenomena.

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