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Hardboiled

Hardboiled crime fiction refers to a literary style pioneered by Dashiell Hammett in the late 1920s and refined by Raymond Chandler beginning in the late 1930s. Hardboiled fiction, most commonly associated with detective stories, is distinguished by an unsentimental portrayal of crime, violence, and sex.

Book Review: <i>A Wild Sheep Chase</i> by Haruki Murakami



Y'know how all my book reviews start with "y'know how?" Y'know how I recently accused Chuck Pahlaniuk of writing a novel that oversold its blurb.. y'know?

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Book review: <i>American Tabloid</i> by James Ellroy



I don’t think the thrill of a good conspiracy can be underestimated. And, while the Kennedy era and the surrounding assassination, drugs, mafia, CIA/FBI, Cuba and, a bit later, Vietnam aren’t quite the dinner party circuit agenda, they were not so long ago and they still hold a spark of interest for a good couple of generations of people. Take me as an example, for instance. I was born in 1980, well after the whole malarkey. But, I still know the names of the Kennedy brothers and their assassins, and Jimmy Hoffa, and an entire selection of corrupt government officials. I’ve heard the speculation. I’ve seen the movies. And nothing has grabbed me quite so much as James Ellroy’s take on the whole thing. I know it’s fictitious speculation. That doesn’t stop it from being a dirty, rollicking thrill of a read with a cast of duplicitous double agents and their complex juggling of events. In fact, one of the most admirable traits of the book is how much behind the scenes action occurs in concert with the facts.

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Book review: <i>Bad Boy Brawly Brown</i> by Walter Mosley



When a man has lived the way Easy Rawlins has—flirting with the wrong side of the law his whole life (or at least in the six previous Easy Rawlins books)—it’s time for him to settle down. He has responsibilities: Bonnie, his beautiful girlfriend. Jesus and Feather, his adopted kids. Even Frenchie, Feather’s little yellow dog who hates him, is a kind of responsibility. He has a good job and a good home and his best friend’s death on his conscience. And... Walter Mosley’s done it again.

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