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Chick lit

Relatively new and fairly derogatory name for books written by chicks... for chicks...

Book review: <i>The Widow Waltz</i> by Sally Koslow


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A story about a woman having everything she took for granted pulled out from under her, taking a big hit, and finding a way to get her life back in a way that works.

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Book review: <i>Dedication</i> by Emma McLaughlin and Nicola Kraus


the cover of the book

McLaughlin and Kraus are back - and in my opinion, even better than before. Dedication is the quintessential girl's fantasy, with an unexpected happily ever after - where the girl makes the rules.

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Book review: <i>Call Waiting</i> by Michelle Cunnah


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America's answer to Bridget Jones flops spectacularly, in a book that is an embarrassment to read for any fans of the Chick lit genre or Helen Fielding.

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Book review: <i>Bridget Jones's Diary</i> by Helen Fielding



As far as I’m concerned, this is one of the defining books of the “chick lit” genre; so defining, in fact, and followed by so many pale imitations, that Bridget Jones’s Diary should probably surpass this tired and overstuffed genre into something else with the emphasis on “literarty”. There have been so many awful books that have tried to sneak into a similar category, but they just can’t touch the wit and style and glorious lovability of Bridget Jones’s Diary.

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Book review: <i>The Hot Ladies Murder Club</i> by Ann Major


Picture this: women in their thirties who are meant to be classy but like to be called “hot lady” by bikers; ex supermodel being stalked by sexually deviant knighted charity fiend; floppy haired lawyer with a yacht and a hard exterior hiding a broken heart; and some murderous intentions played out in about four seconds to wrap it up when the author got bored. But that’s not all. Ever wondered what kind of undies your heroine wears, and been dissatisfied when other books just don’t provide this vital info? Look no further, and check out just a few of these little gems:

“Removing her gold earrings, she punched the button on the machine to retrieve her phone messages. Then she stripped down to her leopard print uplift bra and matching leopard print thong panties.”

“Her dress was so damp, it clung. Was that a leopard print uplift bra she was wearing underneath it?”

“‘Tuesday’ Hannah whispered, stepping into a pair of bikini, zebra print panties.”

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Book review: <i>Mrs Murphy Hires a Cleaner</i> by Kath Kincaid


I realise that it’s a category that many scoff at, and frankly, I think there are some books that are placed in the category of chick-lit unfairly because they are a bit more than the genre has become. Mrs Murphy Hires a Cleaner is not one of those books; it sits happily and unashamedly in the chick-lit section, although it’s of a slightly more mature character and has some relatively humorous bits. It’s a quick and fairly engaging read—I finished the 489 pages in a day. It wasn’t overly special—I’ll have forgotten it in a week and won’t have the desire to read it again—it was a pleasant and light distraction of a book.

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