warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/www/drupal/drupal-6.19/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 34.

Play review: Dial L for Latch-Key by Scott Fivelson


the cover of the book

You'll wish you could see Dial L for Latch-Key in a theatre near you immediately after reading this little gem, because then you'd be sitting in a theatre laughing with other people, as opposed to snickering quietly to yourself alone.

Book review: The Beijing Of Possibilities by Jonathan Tel


the cover of the book

With almost text-book precision, Jonathan Tel captures the essence of the perfect short story in this loosely woven collection of heartbreaks, secrets, humanities and mundanities, backdropped by the mysterious Beijing.

Book review: Whom God Would Destroy by Commander Pants


the cover of the book

A light-hearted romp through the big boys of serious topics - Whom God Would Destroy examines the subjects of religion, psychiatry, the mentally ill, and alien conspiracies in a sniggeringly hilarious meander through some cunning plot twists and a whole new understanding of the universe as it is.

Book review: American Hoax by Charles Firth


the cover of the book

If this was lunch, it would be a Wendy's hot dog with everything.

Book review: Twilight by Stephanie Meyer


the cover of the book

What if Joss Whedon wrote like an 8 yr old, Buffy was a petulant, crying moron and Angel was her self flagellating bitch? Stephanie Meyer would be $70 million poorer, that’s what.

Book review: The Troublesome Offspring Of Cardinal Guzman by Louis de Berniéres


the cover of the book

Mildly disappointing, but only compared to the insanely high standards I have come to expect from Mr de Berniéres and his extreme awesomeness as an author.

Book review: Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis


the cover of the book

If this was fused with a grim, dystopian sci-fi blockbuster in some of Godawful teleporter accident it would be the film 'Brazil'.

Book review: Dedication by Emma McLaughlin and Nicola Kraus


the cover of the book

McLaughlin and Kraus are back - and in my opinion, even better than before. Dedication is the quintessential girl's fantasy, with an unexpected happily ever after - where the girl makes the rules.

Book review: Panic by Jeff Abbott


the cover of the book

Feeling like you just haven't had enough spy/CIA conspiracy in your life lately? Lacking in running, gun fights, car chases, and general confusion and accusations about the CIA? Might be time to read Panic...

Book review: Spook Country by William Gibson


the cover of the book

If this was written before anyone had heard of the author, it would get a pretty patchy reception.

Book review: Blockbuster by Tom Shone


the cover of the book

If this was food, it would be a giant tub of fresh popcorn, covered in hot, molten butter, with an old-school choc top for dessert.

Book review: The Broken Shore by Peter Temple


the cover of the book

In the starkness and wild of the Victorian coastal countryside, a seemingly straightforward murder is committed. Detective Joe Cashin, who is in recovery from a mentally and physically scarring encounter on the job, pushes through the veneer of simplicity, and is plunged into a dark, complex crime...

Book review: Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov


the cover of the book

If this was about a pubescent boy instead of a pubescent girl, it would confirm everything a certain sort of person likes to pretend lurks primarily within the purview of the homosexual mindset. But it isn't, so deal with it, heteros.

Book review: The Stone Angel by Katherine Scholes


the cover of the book

How do you know it's going to turn out exactly as you think it will down to the last painful ellipses? Probably the proud "international bestseller" label, partially covered by the "$2 Kmart" pricetag. Redeeming feature? It was purchased by someone else.

Book review: Blaze by Richard Bachman


the cover of the book

A slow man, a dead man, and a baby - Blaze is a soft-pseudo noir novel with a little crime and a big personality, discarded then resurrected by Stephen King.

Book review: Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman


the cover of the book

Neverwhere is a whimsical tale about a man called Richard, doors, rats, myths, and what really happens underneath London.

Book review: The R. Crumb Handbook by Robert Crumb and Peter Poplaski


the cover of the book

If this was funnier, contained no sex whatsoever, five times less interesting to look at, but only slightly more suitable for children, it would be a The Charles Schulz Story, published 1971. (Have you READ early Peanuts? Good grief.)

Book review: Holy Cow! An Indian Adventure by Sarah MacDonald


the cover of the book

An incredibly candid exploration of a few of the religious and cultural elements of that great and varied nation, India. Love it or hate it, there's just something about it...

Syndicate content