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Book Review

Book review: <i>Shakespeare</i> by Bill Bryson


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If this was a play, it would be called "The Extraordinarily Talented But Oddly Modest Playwright Who, It's Easy To Imagine, Finds All This Fuss Amusing".

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Book review: <i>One Step Behind</i> by Henning Mankell


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In a genre where there is so much pulp churned out all the time, it's easy to lose faith in crime fiction. But don't despair, because Henning Mankell is absolutely brilliant, and he rises above the masses effortlessly. Faith restored.

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Book review: <i>No Logo</i> by Naomi Klein


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If this was... my copy of the book, handed to Ms Klein, I'd be interested to hear her thoughts. My brother bought it in Thailand and it's obviously pirated. The cover looks OK until you try to bend it, the body paper is almost transparent, and there's evidence of low-grade scanning every other page. Large-scale piracy of Western goods, as the flipside of sweatshop labour, is a topic she leaves untouched.

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Book review: <i>Back Story</i> by David Mitchell


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I always knew I liked David Mitchell, but now it's official; he's like, in my top ten favourite people of all time list.

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Book review: <i>Jasmine</i> by Noboru Tsujihara


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Jasmine is an epic tale set between two very different countries. Spanning generations, filled with intrigue, tragedy, and the intricate delicacy of the art of drinking tea.

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Book review: <i>The Toe Tag Quintet</i> by Matthew Condon


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A good, solid collection of crime-solving tales, infused with big pinch of Australiana and a twinkle in the eye.

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Book review: <i>God's Boat</i> by Kaori Ekuni


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This is a tale of true love and heartbreak, of fantasy and reality. A glorious narrative told by two different people; Yoko, a dreamer waiting for her true love to catch up to her, and Soko, her daughter and confidant. But Soko can't be expected to live Yoko's dream forever.

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Book review: <i>Christmas In Absaroka County</i> by Craig Johnson


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Christmas In Absaroka County is just the thing to get you into the spirit of the season. A tiny taster of the Absaroka County; my only complaint would be that there just wasn't enough of it!

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Book review: <i>Green To Go</i> by John H Cunningham


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Buck Reilly is back! In a fast paced romp across continents, joined by his long suffering mechanic and the faithful Betty, Buck is fighting for his reputation and his life with his quirky charm and a whole lot of luck. But will his luck run out when he is stranded in the last place in the world he wants to be?

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Book review: <i>Johnny Passe</i> by Scott Fivelson and Tim Cleavenger


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”I'm Passe. Johnny Passe.” In the big city where everyone scurries onto the next big trend, and the classics fall by the wayside, it's easy to become passe. Unless you're noir by Fivelson and Cleavenger. In this case, Passe is enduring.

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Book review: <i>The Three Impostors And Other Stories</i> by Arthur Machen


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If this was a residence, it would be a garret in a boarding house in a part of town that was once architecturally significant and dignified but is now decrepit and largely abandoned. With the door nailed shut and a sulphurous smell. (In fact, I'm sure Machen could do better than "sulphurous"...)

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Book review: <i>Red Right Return: A Buck Reilly Adventure</i> by John H Cunningham


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When Jimmy Buffet sang “Son of a son of a sailor”, he could have been singing about this particular Buck Reilly Adventure.

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Book review: <i>Watchmen / The Dark Knight Returns</i> by Alan Moore & Dave Gibbons / Frank Miller & Lynn Varley


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If these were turned into movies by people who actually gave a crap about them, then they'd make pretty good films but still probably wouldn't hold up to multiple viewings the way the comics do.

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Book review: <i>Another Broken Wizard</i> by Colin Dodds


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The second-wave rite-of-passage story (ie late twenties as opposed to late teens) has been done a lot lately. But if you want a solid example of the genre, go with Another Broken Wizard. Dodds has done an outstanding job painting a poignant, utterly unselfconscious depiction of growing up.

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Book review: <i>Devil May Care</i> by Sebastian Faulks, 'writing as Ian Fleming'


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If this was a car, it would be a grey 1933 Bentley convertible with an Amherst-Villiers supercharger (installed against the advice of MI5 mechanics), NO machine guns and NO freaking ejector seats (though there could well be a bottle of single malt in the glove box).

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Book review: <i>Letters in Cardboard Boxes</i> by Abby Slovin


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Letters in Cardboard Boxes is a very realistic, well developed character study, that deals with fairly full and complex family dynamic issues in a sensitive and undramatic way, and is really given extra dimension by virtue of it's web-based publication.

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Book review: <i>Love Me</i> by Garrison Keillor


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If this was... Wine, it would be that Cab Merlot I so freakin' elegantly analogise in paragraph three.

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Book review: <i>Steplings</i> by C W Smith


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Steplings takes the reader an empathetic journey through the trials and pitfalls of teen years while exploring blended families and the odd relationships bred within them.

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Book review: <i>The Mutt: How To Skateboard and Not Kill Yourself</i> by Rodney Mullen with Sean Mortimer


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-If this was any more ready to be turned into a film, it would be about a pair of hard-punching renegade cops who break the law to get results.

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