Welcome to Illiterarty.com...

Welcome book lovers. You are amongst friends here. This site aims to provide book reviews, articles about books and authors, possibly an interview or two here and there and some short stories by our reviewers. If you like what you see sign up to our RSS feed. If you would like to write for Illiterarty, either your own material or a book review, please contact us. Enjoy!

Book review: The Hundred Year House by Rebecca Makkai

Book review: The Hundred Year House by Rebecca Makkai


the cover of the book

Some houses have a history. People believe the Devohr mansion is haunted, but nobody knows the whole ghost story...

Book review: Justice Inc by Dale Bridges


the cover of the book

Can love blossom in Omni-Mart against impossible odds? What would really happen if people could live forever? And just how would you program your ideal girlfriend? These short stories are not for the faint hearted!

Book review: Any Other Name by Craig Johnson

Book review: Any Other Name by Craig Johnson


the cover of the book

In the wilds of northern Wyoming, Sheriff Walt Longmire battles the clock to solve a missing person's case. The pressure is on, and from the worst possible direction – his daughter, Cady, is about to give birth to his first grandchild and if he isn't there, she'll kill him.

Book review: The Greenland Breach by Bernard Besson


the cover of the book

In a not-too-distant future, global warming has become a hard reality that is impossible to ignore or deny. When disaster strikes in Greenland, questions about who is at fault and the consequences for big oil companies and the countries they represent send shock-waves through nations. Can one small group of French investigators get to the bottom of the conspiracy and corruption before it's too late?

Book review: Adrian Mole: The Prostrate Years by Sue Townsend


the cover of the book

I would never have considered the possibility of Adrian Mole growing old, were it not for the recent death of his creator Ms Townsend. So it was with a twinge of sadness for a lost childhood author that I picked up her last Adrian Mole story, because, let's face it, Adrian and I grew up together.

Book Review: Pinkerton's Great Detective; The Amazing Life And Times Of James McParland by Beau Riffenburgh


the cover of the book

Back in the days of the actual wild west, America was actually wild. The landscape was unforgiving, the miners were rough, and the atmosphere was lawless. Who kept everything together?

Book review: Spirit Of Steamboat by Craig Johnson


the cover of the book

Walt Longmire is back – taken down memory lane by a very special ghost of Christmas past.

Book review: Admission Of Guilt by T V LoCicero


the cover of the book

On the streets of Detroit, there's an epidemic of drug crime ruining a generation of kids. Can one lone man on a mission take down a mighty drug lord, armed only with sheer determination?

Book review: Gonzo: The Life of Hunter S. Thompson by Jann S. Wenner & Corey Seymour


the cover of the book

If this was a funeral, it would be the loudest, drunkest wake ever, followed by a beery blether about the old dead bastard til the sun comes up.

Book review: The Boy In The Snow by M J McGrath


the cover of the book

The Iditarod dogsled race is one of the biggest and toughest races in Alaska. But amongst the distraction, there are some disturbing forces at work in Anchorage. Can one woman singlehandedly uncover the rot that goes deep into the Alaskan political landscape?

Book review: Marry Me by Carey Marx


the cover of the book

If this was put onto the desk of your average Hollywood producer, it would be bought for MILLIONS. "Goddammit Joel, get Murray in London on a conference right now! Somebody just dropped two hundred minutes of uncut Wacky Date Montage on my desk and I need Hugh Grant STAT!"

Book review: Dead Like Me by Kelly Miller


the cover of the book

Kate Springer is trying to keep her own past under wraps and focus on the future. But her own face on a young victim brings everything flooding back. Can she solve the case and manage not to lose herself completely in the process?

Book review: The True Story Of Butterfish by Nick Earls


the cover of the book

If this was a house, it would be the one Curtis Holland lives in - a classy little Queenslander with a studio out the back in a granny flat, a great record collection and clean sheets for visitors.

Book review: The Car Bomb by T V LoCicero


the cover of the book

Love him or hate him, Frank DeFauw is with you every night at five and eleven, bringing you the news live to your TV. And everyone in town knows him. But will Frank go all the way in the pursuit of justice, even if it hurts his oldest and closest friends?

Book review: Sunshine On Putty by Ben Thompson


the cover of the book

If this was the central character from a film, it would be John Cusack in High Fidelity.

Book review: A Commonplace Killing by Sian Busby


the cover of the book

In a post-war England that is bleak and crime ridden, murder is par for the course. Can Detective Inspector Cooper solve this commonplace killing, this murder of one woman amongst many?

Book review: King Killer Chronicles, Day One by Patrick Rothfuss


the cover of the book

Cover

From a distance, it's not too bad. The shadowed, hooded figure is suitably mysterious - there's no indication of a hero or villain, and he appears to be bleeding from the eyes. The foiled copper text is appropriately twiddly, but at least avoids cheesy medievalisation. Likewise, the image, though not surprising, lacks the standard "tiny-figures-'gainst-an-epic-panorama" that makes every fantasy book published since 1981 look exactly the same. Bring back the nude chicks with swords, I say, just before they throw me out of the pub. Pricks. Regardless, close inspection is a bit less favourable. The image is simply a crude collage - you could knock it up in Photoshop in an afternoon. The foliage framing the central image appears in different resolutions simultaneously, there's only one leaf repeated a dozen times, and, as we learn in the first 2 pages of the text, the blood is supposed to be hair. Red hair, yes, but accidentally making the cover look like more Stephen King than Tolkein is really not something an "artist" should do. Goodkind's last books were a bit like this, too. What's going on? Doesn't anyone want to pay painters for beautiful, ornate wrap-arounds any more? Curse you, Photoshop! How many lives must you ruin!!!!!?!!!?

Book review: Glazed City Eyes by Preston M Smith, Jacob McKinley


the cover of the book

What makes a writer? Is it living the tortured life of an artist, or is it actually getting your shit together and... you know... writing?

Book review: Snuff by Chuck Palaniuk


the cover of the book

If this was any less erotic, grandparents would be involved. (The fact that the author failed to include any was most likely an accident.)

Syndicate content